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Trouvais Fortuny and 18th c textile pillows

Hello from your intermittent blogger! I am still in self imposed heavy editing mode. But that doesn’t mean I don’t stop to smell the roses…or gardenias…and enjoy my favorite pieces. A few years ago I was lucky to find a watery “Venetian lagoon blue” silk velvet Fortuny gown. Old…of course. Very early and without a label…but clearly authentic. Ladies would send their pleated silk gowns back to Fortuny after sitting would eventually press their pleats flat…and he would use his secret process to re-pleat the silk and send it back to his clients. The entirely pleated Delphos gowns were light enough to inspire Venetian Murano beads to weight them, and could be coiled into a small round box for storage. Mariano Fortuny (more here) used proprietary techniques for both pleating and hand dyeing and stenciling his silks and silk velvets. The hand created texture and colors, and even the slight wear of time at the edges, elevate the dresses to a piece of art. Trouvais Fortuny with 18th textilesForuny’s father was both a celebrated painter, and ardent collector of 18th c and earlier textiles…and early textiles clearly influence Mariano Fortuny’s work. Here is a one of my favorite 18th century pieces…a French silk satin “Bizarre” patterned cape, with large swirls of stylized peach pomegranates. So futuristic…and exuberant…from three hundred years ago. If you study Fortuny patterns you can see the reference to 16th-18th century design. Trouvais Fortuny

The fabulous pleats…waves of teal blue…Trouvais Antique Fortuny

The sleeves and edges of the gown tied and set with Murano beads…

When we visited Italy last Fall we started in Venice…and dropped by the Fortuny Palazzo. It was closed while we were there, but you can check their website here if you want to plan a trip around an exhibit. Trouvais Fortuny PalazzoTrouvais Fortuny in VeniceTrouvais Fortuny Venice

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A slideshow from Venice…too much wonderfulness to capture it all…

Hope you are enjoying your fall…and Buona Fortuna on your own projects!

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