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Recently Paris Apartment here and Gypsy Purple here have

posted this gorgeous photo of a pelmet trimmed, ciel de lit topped,

and luxuriously draped 18th century French bed…

Have you made up your mind about the couple that

lives in this house?

Though it’s made its way through the blog-o-sphere…I cropped

and posted this photo in July of ’09 in Red Burnished Neutrals here.

I was entranced by the gorgeous photography…and narrowed

in as close as possible to study all the details…

Of course…from my point of view…

The advantage of scanning your own photos is that it allows

you to zero in on the face cast in bronze at the table leg’s intersect…

or the artlessly off-center sketched nude beyond the doorway…

The glowing red of an antique leather chair

and voluminous carmine curtains….

Martin Morrell photography

Un-cropped…here is the original photo by Martin Morrell

A striking balance of soothing neutrals and overt avant-garde…

Have you changed your mind about the home-owners?

Another view of the bedroom…an 18th century Italian chandelier…

An ottoman covered in old French fabric and 17th century walnut wardrobe

from Piedmont. A Paula Rego painting…part of the owner’s

large collection of modern art….

Chintzes from the Tree of Life range by Braquenié

for Pierre Frey in a guest bedroom….

Dining room

The ballroom…added in the 1920’s…

More antique linen at the windows, 17th century chandelier

from Genoa and 18th century chairs from Turin…

Almost every view shown is painted with soothing neutrals…

yet adds a tiny bit of drama…

Or maybe not so tiny….

Red glass vase from Venice filled with

flowers from the garden on a stone plinth table…

Tea-soaked antique linen slipcovers…


A Martin Malone painting with 1930’s green leather chairs…

So…opening up the view a bit reveals quite a bit more

about the home’s heart…

What does your home say about you?

Petersham House

The 17th century home of Gael and Francesco Boglione

who created London’s Petersham Nurseries next door…

Petersham Nurseries click here

Vogue Living Australia May/June ’09

By the Light of the Sea

Daraux By the Light of the Sea

Jean-Loup Daraux

By the Light of the Sea

Photographs by Mario Ciampi

Daraux By the Light of the Sea

The colors and textures and exquisite details captured

in this gorgeous book have inspired me as I’ve worked on

my husband’s study. Love the use of antique hardware

and reclaimed wood. The sonorous quality of deep

natural tones balanced with just the right amount of

color and light…

 

 

Daraux By the light of the Sea

The artist, sculptor, collector Jean-Loup Daraux writes:

“I mixed contemporary with antique, languid serene colours with

others that were audacious, light refined materials with the raw, wood

and concrete, mosaics and metal. And of course I filled it with objects,

selected for their unlimited poetry.”

 

French design book

Detail of riveted door and antique French bronze watering can…

Jean-Loup again… “I love iron because it lies between the flame and

the anvil, because it comes down to us from the beginning of time”…

and “how can one not be enchanted by the successive repairs

on this very old watering can that I have had for so many years. “

Trouvais 18th c French bronze watering can

 

A detail I hadn’t really noticed until I recently found my own little

18th century French watering can (above) …

It reminds me of the French term “belle laide”…literally

“beautiful ugly”. And, as usual, I wonder where it’s been…

French Design book

You can catch glimpses of his antique watering cans

in several photos…I love homes that give a¬† sense of

the passions of those who live there…

French design

 

Here’s a larger photo that shows how all the elements are balanced…

the touch of purple…the verdigris of old copper in the cabinet…

the rough with the smooth…

French design book

 

Gorgeous composition of hard lines, strong color,

rough antiquity, Jean-Loup’s modern painting…

French design

 

Traditional study elements…the ladder, leather club chairs, a trio of

classically moulded bookcases, simple drapery hardware…

Beautifully underscored by the modernity of rough etched

concrete floors, the antiquity of over-sized antique crystal and urn…

 

French design book

In a foreword on Jean-Loup Daraux’s style, Guillaume Tournier writes:

“…to decorate a home is not to “dress” it, but to give it life, to fill it

with dreams and the irreplaceable: humanity, friendship and beauty.”

Of course I’m only scratching the surface of this beautiful book…

Lightly written…it’s a bit like poetry…and I find something new in

it every time I look through it…